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If you’re new to data analysis, you might be feeling a little overwhelmed. There are so many different terms and concepts to learn, not to mention all of the software tools you need to be familiar with. But don’t worry, we’re here to help. In this blog post, we’ll give you a crash course in using Excel formulas and functions for data analysis. By the end of this post, you’ll know how to use some of the most popular and useful Excel formulas and functions. Let’s get started! And become expert in excel.

Excel Formulas

An Excel formula is a set of instructions that tells Excel what calculation to perform on a certain cell or range of cells. Formulas always start with an equal sign (=), followed by the function name or operators that you want to use. For example, the formula =A1+B1 will add the contents of cells A1 and B1. 

You can use formulas to do things like summing up data, calculating averages, or counting the number of cells that contain a certain value. In fact, there are dozens of different built-in functions that you can use in your formulas. To see a complete list of these functions, click on the “Formulas” tab at the top of the Excel window, then select “Insert Function.” 

If you want to get really advanced with your formulas, you can also create your own custom functions using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications). But we won’t be going into detail on how to do that in this post. 

Excel Functions

In addition to formulas, Excel also has something called functions. Functions are very similar to formulas in that they allow you to perform calculations on data in your spreadsheet. However, there are some key differences between formulas and functions. 

First of all, unlike formulas, functions always take arguments. Arguments are values or references to values that are passed into a function; they tell the function what calculation to perform. For example, the SUM function takes one or more numeric arguments and returns the sum of those numbers. So if you wanted to sum up the contents of cells A1 through A5 using a function, you would use the following syntax: =SUM(A1:A5). 

Functions can also take text or logical arguments—not just numeric ones—unlike formulas. And finally, while some functions can be used as array formulas (more on that later), most cannot. 

Now that we’ve covered the basics of Excel formulas and functions, let’s take a look at how you can use them for data analysis…

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